HOME  |  ABOUT COYOTE  |  PROGRAMS  |  EVENTS  |  MEDIA  |  TAKE ACTION  |  RESOURCES  |  CONTACT/ABOUT  |  SHOP  |  DONATE  

For immediate release: June 4, 2012

Town of Superior, CO & Project Coyote Launch Partnership
Coexisting with Coyotes

Superior, CO- Today the town of Superior, Colorado and the national non-profit organization Project Coyote announced the launch of a formal partnership to promote coexistence between people and coyotes in the town of Superior, a suburb ofDenver with approximately 12,500 residents.

"We are excited about this partnership with Project Coyote,"said Alan McBeath, Town of Superior's Park Superintendent. "The Town of Superior is proud to promote coexistence as we recognize that learning to live with our wild neighbors is a community endeavor. Through this partnership, we aim to ensure that residents of Superior are informed about coyote ecology and behavior and about methods for reducing negative encounters with our wild neighbors."

Project Coyote will assist the Town of Superior with outreach to the community about living with coyotes and will help coordinate response to concerns about coyotes.

"Colorado is a trend-setter when it comes to advocating coexistence with urban wildlife," said Ashely DeLaup, Project Coyote's Colorado Representative. "We share our rural and urban landscapes with coyotes and this necessitates understanding how to reduce negative encounters between wildlife, people, and their domestic animals."

DeLaup, who served as the City of Denver's' wildlife ecologist and coyote specialist, helped develop Denver's proactive coyote management plan, which emphasizes public education, reduction of wildlife attractants, and hazing of coyotes when necessary. Denver's management plan has since served as a model that communities across the country have tailored and adopted.

Coyotes are native to Colorado and are one of the most adaptable and resilient native carnivores in North America. They serve a vital ecological role in helping to reduce rodent populations and maintain bird species diversity and abundance by limiting mesocarnivore populations (e.g.foxes, raccoons, skunks, etc.). Revered as North America's native Song Dog by many Native American tribes, the call of the coyote can now be heard in every U.S. state except Hawaii.

###

For more information on Project Coyote, please visit:
http://www.projectcoyote.org/
Project Coyote promotes coexistence between people and wildlife through education, science, and advocacy.

For more about the town of Superior CO, please visit:
http://superiorcolorado.gov/

Copyright Project Coyote, All Rights Reserved. Site Credits